EPIGRAPH

  THE BEGINNING
  THE HISTORY OF BAM
  BAMLAG
  AFTER THE WAR, BUT BEFORE BAM
  THE CITY
  THE BIG CITY
  THE CELEBRITIES
  THE ART AND SOCIAL LIFE
  THE FIRST DECADE. 1975-1985.
CHRONOLOGY OF EVENTS.

  THE BREAKING POINT
  SOUL RELAXATION
  CATASTROPHES
  WHAT'S LACKING IN THE CITY
  WOULD YOU LIKE MORE DETAILS?
  TOWNS AND VILLAGES OF THE AREA

  EPILOG

Tynda (Biased Notes)

 

AFTER THE WAR, BUT BEFORE BAM

Tyndinsky village was remaining a center of the area and continued to lead a life of a small highway-adjacent settlement (I am tired of repeating "Tyndinsky settlement."Further it's going to be "Tynda." A. I.).

In the sixties, according to the reminiscences of the local old-timers, Tynda looked like this:

When you enter the town, there is a cemetery.A "great" idea - to have a cemetery as a gate to a town.I understand - a convenient proximity of AYH and all that, but a cemetery!.. Past the cemetery, there were houses of DSR (Road Construction-Repair Agency) that stretched to a later built Voentorg (Military Supply Agency) supply base.On Yakutskaya Street there were a movie house and a kindergarten.

Then, before a wooden bridge (at the time) across Tynda River, to the left -- "BAM" stadium.There were some small lakes behind the stadium, and they stretched on the side of the highway towards "Zarya" collective farm.They were very small and shallow, just big enough for kid rafting.

The first wooden bridge across Tynda River was built in 1927.It was often destroyed by floodwaters.In 1951-52 they built another wooden bridge, a much stronger one.The present concrete bridge was built in 1975.They say that when it was just begun being built, one of the motorcyclists, having mixed up the roads, dove off the unfinished bridge into the river.

Over the bridge, down and to the right, there was a tea bar.Along the highway on both sides there were the DSO stores.To the right, up the hill City Communist Party Committee building.Not too far away from it -- a large wooden building of the district's House of Culture.

On July 28th 1957, next to the House of Culture, there was a solemn ceremony dedicated to opening of a new V. I. Lenin monument.It was built in honor of the 40th anniversary of the October socialist revolution of 1917.Maybe "socialist" ought to be capitalized?I don't remember this subtleties any more.And it seemed that these things one would never forget.We were so proud of our Triumphant Socialist State.We felt sorry for the poor Negroes living in America after watching the movies where parasite-capitalists were slaving the workers.Sorry, I strayed away a little.Ok, here it is.The opening was really grand.There were speeches from the party and the government upper echelon members, as well as from labor veterans and the best performing workers.Probably there was an orchestra playing. At the beginning of 1978, the monument was moved next to the building of the City Party Committee.That's where it is today.The monument's height is three meters.It's made out of cast and covered with bronze paint.

On October 21st 1967 a monument dedicated to local soldiers who perished in WWII was unveiled.Local Komsomol members raised the money for the monument.They collected scrap metal as well as conducted street cleaning sessions.They were also the builders of the monument under the supervision of the District Committee Secretary Victor Mikhailovich Busygin (at the moment).He and his son made the Order of the Great Patriotic war (a name for WWII in Russia) that's on the left side of the monument.On the right side -- a barelief symbolizing the three generations: those who brought the Soviet power, those who fought for it in the battles and those who carry the banner of communism forward towards its full victory (that never materialized).Generations that successfully destroyed this communism are not on there.All the komsomol members regardless of the age were building the monument.The metal plates were taken from the bridge on the 6th kilometer towards the "Zarya" collective farm.Most of the bridge was removed during the war and transported together with the BAM rails to Stalingrad.The plate with the Order and the barelief were smelted in Blagoveschensk at the "Amur Metal Worker" smelter.Above the Order there are bronze letters: "Nobody is forgotten and nothing is forgotten."Below - "In fair memory of our locals who died for Motherland in 1941-45."A metal capsule containing a message note to the future generations and lists of perished during the war Tyndalites was placed into the monument.In April 1985 there was some restoration work done on the memorial.Management agencies of "BAMstroimekanizatsiya," "Tsentrobamstroi," "Tyndatransstroi," "Bamtransvzryvprom," VSUM participated in the restoration.The author of the restoration sketch was the chief of the industrial group of the construction and architecture department of Tynda executive committee A. H. Shmit'ko.

If you turn left at the crossroads towards Ust'-Nyukzha, on the left side there were military draft office and the passport issuing agency.To the right - the Evenki School.If you go further, you'll end up on the Verkhne-Naberezhnaya Street with two-story houses.In the first house there was a district hospital and obstetrics.

These streets were Tyndas borders: Pervomaiskaya, Verkhne-Naberezhnaya on the left, Nagornaya on the right, and a Ust'-Korallovaya hill.In general - a rather small village with a population of about four thousand.

That's how it used to be. And then again they began BAM construction. Tynda began changing.